Bengali Kachcha Aamer Mishti Chutney


The one is the down right corner is without sweet for my mother. If you use sugar instead of jaggery the color will be golden yellow.

It is amazing how certain dishes are prepared and relished all across India with slight variations in the spices. This version of launji is slightly different from the one I make North Indian style.  Here is the recipe for Meethi Khathai as called it since childhood.

In this version of kachcha Aamer mishti chutney I have used panch phoron. I keep the mango stones ( guthli) in the dish as I love to suck on the spicy tangy sweet guthli. I also keep a lot of liquid in this. A mandatory side dish in summer when the markets are flooded with raw and ripe mangoes.

You can have a bowlful on its own or pair it with steamed rice, paratha, roti etc. Some people peel the mangoes in this dish but I keep the peel.

One more thing that I do is marinate the raw mango slices with red chili and salt for 10 minutes so that the fruit releases water and softens a little.

It quickens the cooking process too.

Here’s a simple way to make this wonder dish.

Ingredients –

Raw mangoes – 1/2 kg (4 medium size)

Organic Jaggery (grated/powder) – 1/2 cup / as desired ( I prefer the chutney a little sour) Fresh grated ginger – 1/2 tbsp

Water -3-4 cups 9 depends on how much liquid you need)

Whole dry red chilies – 2-3

Black mustard seeds – 2-3 tsp

Panch Phoran – 1 tsp (roasted and pounded cumin, fenugreek, mustard, nigella and fennel seeds)

Salt – to taste

Turmeric powder – 1 tsp

Red chilli powder – 1 tsp

Mustard oil – 2 tbsp

Steps – 

Wash and cut mangoes with skin lengthwise. Keep the stone.

In a wide plate keep the mango slices and stones, sprinkle salt and red chilli powder and rub it in till every piece is coated. Let it rest.

After 10 minutes heat mustard oil in a thick bottom pan.

Add the mustard seeds and dry red chilli as a tempering. Once the seeds crackle, add the marinated mango pieces and the mango stones. Give a good stir.

Saute it for 5-10 minutes n low medium heat and then stir in grated ginger and turmeric.

Add water to your liking, increase heat and bring it to boil. This preparation is a bit thin so I keep one and half cup extra jhol over the amount needed to cover the mango pieces.

Once the liquid starts boiling lower the heat and let the mango cook till soft yet firm. Don’t let it disintegrate.

At this point add the jaggery. You can use Sugar too. Mix well. Test for sweetness, salt and spice threshold. Add if required more. If you add the jaggery/sugar before the mangoes won’t soften so make sure the mango pieces have softened to your satisfaction.

Sprinkle the panch phoran and stir. Turn off the gas and let it cool to room temperature.

Spoon the aam er chutney in a glass bowl or Jar. Always use glass containers for sour dishes.

You can keep this in an airtight container for 5-7 days in the fridge.

Use dry, clean spoons to take out the chutney.

Relish this side dish as a post meal dessert or with steamed rice or luchi.

Note – If you do not have panch phoran you can use bhaja masala or roasted cumin and roasted fennel powder too.

Advertisements

Quick And Easy Kairi Kanda Takku | Raw Mango And Onion Relish


 

Each Maharashriyan family has their version of takku.Sweet and sour, this relish is not cooked like South Indian thakkus / thokkus and the use of finely chopped onions gives it a unique sweetness which is different from the sweetness that jaggery gives to the dish.

Summer is the best time to make pickles, chunda, launji etc apart from fresh chutneys. One can see carts full of raw and ripe mangoes all over the city and this year has brought in a very good crop of mangoes of all kinds.

We don’t use the ramkela variety of achar ka aam for these chutneys and relishes but the smaller variety whose skin is softer then the pickling mango of north.

You can eat this relish with almost anything from rotis to curd rice or even mathari etc. I sometimes spread it inside wraps to give them a tangy flavor.

I make it fresh in small quantities because that’s how it tastes best.

To make this lip smacking takku you will need very few simple ingredients.

Ingredients:

Medium Size Raw mango – 2 grated

Onion – 2 medium size

Salt- to taste

Red chili powder – 1 teaspoon

Mustard seeds brown (rai) – 1 teaspoon

Mustard seeds black (sarso) – 1 teaspoon

Fenugreek Seeds – 2 teaspoon

Oil – 2 tablespoon

Asafoetida – 1/4 teaspoon

Jaggery – as per taste and sourness of mangoes.

Steps –

Wash, peel and grate raw mangoes. Keep aside.

I like those which are beginning to ripe a little from inside along with completely raw ones. Gives takku a lovely flavor.

Chop the onion very fine. I don’t like grated version. Chopping fine gives takku a nice crunch.

Warm a seasoning pan and dry roast the brown mustard seeds and one teaspoon of fenugreek seeds separately till fragrant. Don’t let them burn.

Remove and grind them into a fine ( but not very smooth) powder. I powder them on silbatta (grinding stone).

Now add this powder mix along with  red chili powder, salt, onion and jaggery in grated raw mangoes and gently mix well with your fingers by tossing the mixture slowly. .

Let it sit for half and hour then taste and adjust sweetness, salt and spices. By now jaggery will melt and get well incorporated with the juices released from mango and onions.

Heat oil in the same seasoning pan and remove from heat once warm enough. Add asafoetida, black mustard seeds (sarso) to it. When they crackle, add the remaining fenugreek seeds and let them brown a little.

When the oil cools down, pour it over the takku and mix.

Your delicious takku is ready to eat.

This keeps good for a week to ten days in the fridge.

There isn’t much oil in this recipe and  unlike other thokku it is not cooked. You will relish the raw flavors of mango and onion in this relish.

Serve with chapati, curd rice, mathari or chapati nachos or use it for layering rolls etc. The tangy sweet taste will always tickle your taste buds.

 

 

 

Recipe – Mahni – A Tangy Himachali Dish Made From Raw Mangoes


I discovered the authentic mouth-watering dishes from the north-western areas of Himachal Pradesh ( Bilaspur, Una, Hamirpur, Kangra and Chamba districts) during my visit to the ancestral village of my in-laws.  The food, mainly vegetarian, is prepared keeping in mind the geographical and climatic conditions. Simple and nutritious, the food includes dishes made from locally available pulses, cereals, tubers, vegetables and fruits. Milk is also used in the form of curds and buttermilk in many of the dishes.

Some of the indigenous dishes include, babroo, bhaturu, lasaure ki sabzi, ratalu ki sabzi,  sarson ka saag and other leafy greens of the season, kadhi, mah ki daal, khatta, mahni, kehru or rehru, pahari madra, rotis made from maize or wheat flour, rice, chick peas, black gram, red kidney beans (Rajmah), rot ( a sweet deep fried wheat bread), gulgule, bated (steamed or fried pedrode) to name a few. I will post the recipes as and when I make them.

Mahni is a delightful semi liquid dish made from raw or half-ripe green mangoes and is usually eaten with plain boiled rice as a side dish.

 

To make Mahni you will need :

Raw or half-ripe mangoes – 2 large

Onion – One large

Roasted Cumin seed Powder – 1 Teaspoon

Salt – To taste

Sugar – If required (depends on how sweet or sour you like the dish)

Red chili Powder – 1/2 Teaspoon

Fresh Crushed Mint Leaves –  Just a few

?????????????

 

To prepare :

Wash and boil the raw mangoes.  ( you can steam them too)

Let them cool a little and take out the pulp in a bowl.

Mash the pulp to make it smooth.

Finely chop the onions.

Wash the fresh mint leaves and crush them a little. Save a few for garnish.

Add cold water to the pulp stirring it gently till it makes a nice semi liquid preparation.

Add the chopped onions and spices.

Add a little jaggery or sugar if the preparation is too sour. I like it tangy sweet.

Taste to adjust the amount of sweetness or spices.

Garnish with mint leaves and keep it in the fridge.

Serve cool.

Tip – you can add a few  Moong pakodi, boondi or handful  of boiled black gram to it. I like it just simple. Never use metal to stir, serve or store sour preparations.

The first version is with slightly ripened ambi (those which start turning light yellow) with sugar.

This is with absolutely raw ambi and organic jaggery. Don’t go by color. The gud is dark but I’ve used very little in it. The taste is perfect spicy sour n sweet in that order. The one in small bowl us without jaggery. No meetha for mom coz of slightly high blood sugar.
I prefer this version to the sugar one. We add boiled kala chana too to Manhi. Tastes divine.

I first had Manhi at Mandi bus station. There was a waterfall after the bridge and a small dhaba opposite it. They served Mahni, simple Kali daal and rice. Tea was made in one corner. Mostly the driver’s stopped there. One of the best meals I ever had. I was thirteen at that time.

Enjoy this tangy sweet dish with rice or roti.