Teen Chhatris | Hazire, Makanpur Village, Indrapuram


Last year I finally got a chance to explore the ancient pavilions in Makanpur village inside the posh Indirapuram locality. A slight diversion from my exploration of Delhi monuments. This was as part of discovering lesser known heritage buildings in and around Delhi. I had a few locations marked but could visit only this one before falling sick and then the pandemic ruined my plans.

It took me a lot of effort to locate the place as many of the access points were dug out. The street shop owners, vendors and local residents had little clue about it and were amused as to why a gray haired jeans clad woman with camera is looking for some dilapidated old ruins and that too in blistering summer noon. I kept showing photographs from a national daily to them and finally an old auto driver guiding me to an approximate location. I landed up near the Masjid and again started the search. Finally a shop keeper pointed me to the caretaker of the graveyard, the only one who could guide me. I couldn’t find the old gentleman but someone children got curious and tagged along as I made my way through narrow lanes. One of them asked what I was looking for and seeing the photos exclaimed, ” ye to kabristan mein hain. wahan tala laga hai. andar jana mana hai. sab toota phoota hai. wahan kya kaam hai aapko?” ( these are in the graveyard and the gate is locked. no one is allowed inside. Everything is falling apart. What do want from there?)

I explained I needed to take photos to write about it. Thinking I was a journalist they demanded a picture and in exchanged of that agreed to take me there. We finally reached the place but the man who had the key couldn’t be found. By then I was tired and late for another appointment at my son’s home. I had finally found the gorgeous structures shrouded from all around by tall buildings.

Orphaned and decaying pavilion tombs or chhatris or hazire as called by the local Muslim community are looked after by them. The gate is mostly locked and displays a board claiming it to be a local graveyard. Perhaps this is the only reason why these structures have remained standing even now.

Earlier the structures were visible from NH24 but rampant construction and high rise buildings around it have obscured the view. The pavilions are in a dilapidated state; uncared and forgotten. A mute testimony of a time now gone.

One of the three Chhatris is almost completely gone as you can see. One of the other two is also breaking apart. The blue plaster-work or tile-work on a band around the Dome’s neck is only visible in a few places on the middle structure. Rest has vanished. I didn’t get enough time to study so will go again.

The inverted lotus finial is very prominent in one of the domes.

The chhatris or hazire come under the state archaeological department. ASI has washed its hands off these and they find no place in the list of monuments protected and maintained by them. GDA doesn’t give a care either.

The tombs have a striking resemblance to Yusuf Qattal’s tomb and style of masonry is similar to Jahaz Mahal. The delicate red sandstone pillars, lotus finial and blue tiles suggest it to be either Lodi period or Mughal. I’m no expert so just thinking aloud here. I may be wrong. The motifs are ornate and carved in the maroon tinge of Bharatpur sandstone. Lot of lattice screens were laying around here and there. You can view a few in the picture of the graves below.

The pavilions are often claimed to be from 16th century Mughal period. The local lore about this being the grave of sakka, the bhishti who saved Humayun’s life during the battle of Chausa, doesn’t seem probable to me. There are more than three graves inside the pavilions.

I’m still gathering information about these by discussing with various people who may know the right facts. Will update once something that pin points to the precise date and historical facts is found.

I wasn’t allowed in to inspect the pavilions closely as women aren’t allowed in kabristan ( graveyard) so the photos were taken from right near the gate. There were a very more that one of the young men had taken from my phone but I seem to have lost them. Will update if they’re found.

If you have any authentic documented information about these pavilions then please share.