Shevgyachya Shenganchi Amti |Drumsticks Amti Dal


This recipe post has a little story. A childhood story before plastic took over our lives. We always ate in thalis which were either made of steel or brass even copper. Mainly steel.

We had a low table or chowki and patras with it to sit.  Sometimes we used a chatayi or woven mat too. Food was served in thali and karoti and these small tumblers had tak/ mattha/buttermilk or water. They were always kept on the left side of the thali. Most of the utensils and furniture etc was given away when I was growing up because my parents kept moving from one place to another and carrying too many things was a headache. Mom still managed to save some heirlooms like a betel nut cutter ( sarota), karanji maker and spoon, a few lotas of different shapes and sizes, katoris and thalis, a few brass and copper cooking utensils, milk pots and some other stuff like bolti or morali/vili, a grinding stone, pestle and mortar etc.

This small thali seen here is about 59 years old. It was given to mom when my brother was born, mine is slightly bigger but I loved to eat in this one. Little thali, a small katori and a tiny tumbler. It fitted perfectly in the imaginary tales I spun all day as a kid. As I grew up things changed and reluctantly we shifted to melamine / china/ glass plates but now i’m going back to thalis.

Today I was reminiscent of my aaji ( maternal grandmother) and of many other things that were part of my childhood and growing up years and I wondered how does one feel eating in old utensils that have been a part of so many kitchen stories. I can tell you there is a certain joy and fulfillment that only these utensils can provide. It is the same with food. There are some soul foods that stay with you from your childhood to old age and as you grow older you crave for them more. Varan Bhat and Amti bhat are two such dishes. You can call them pillars of daily Maharashtriyan cuisine.

Simple, soulful and full of good nutrition, I love amti in all forms poured over hot steamed rice with a generous helping of hot ghee over it. Not many dishes can give me the kind of satisfaction like this does. I make it with or without coconut and with different lentils. All have their unique tastes but this particular one I like the most. A comfort food for all times made with toor dal / arhar dal / split pigeon pea, goda masala, tamarind and jaggery or kokum and jaggery for that tangy sweet taste. The flavor from kokum is distinctly different from the tamarind one. I have used soaked dry kokum here.

A typical meal for me would be steamed rice / bajra bhakri, garlic chutney or lime pickle, stuffed brinjals with in peanut gravy, aamti , fresh buttermilk and salt on side. Maybe a bowl of shrikhand or a peda to go with it. No other meals can beat it.

This amti has the goodness of tender drumsticks or sehjan ki phali or moringa pods which I love to suck on taking in the sweet flavorful flesh from inside.

Ingredients : 

Toor dal / arhar dal / split pigeon peas – 1/2 Cup

Tender drumsticks – 4 medium

Onion – 1 large

Curry leaves – 6-8

Kokum – 3 -4  or tamarind pulp as desired ( approx – 2 tbsp

Asafoetida – 2 pinch

Turmeric powder – 1/2 tsp

Red chilli powder –  to taste

Whole red chlli – 1=-2

Cumin seeds – 1/2 tsp

Mustard seeds – 1/2 tsp

Fenugreek seeds – 1/2 tsp

Goda masala ( I used homemade) – 2 tbsp

Jaggery – 1-2 tbsp

Ghee / clarified butter –  3-4 tbsp

Chopped coriander leaves – 2-3 tbsp

Grated coconut – 1/4 Cup ( optional ) ( I didn’t use)

Grated ginger – 1 tsp

Steps : 

  1. Wash and soak toor dal for 15 minutes then pressure cook it with grated ginger, salt, turmeric powder, asafoetida for 3-4 whistles or until soft.
  2. Soak kokum / tamarind ( if not using the seedless pulp) in warm water for 20 min and then mash the tamarind into a clear paste ( remove threads / seeds etc) .No need to mash kokum, just throw t in the dal later while seasoning.
  3. Chop onions in big chucks. 6-8 pieces of a large onion.
  4. Wash cut and steam the drumsticks. Check to rule out the bitterness.
  5. Once the dal is done, take a masher and totally mash the dal till it is one smooth mix. Add a cup of water and boil on low flame.
  6. add the kokum or tamarind paste at this time to dal.
  7. Add the goda masala to dal and stir. Also add the jaggery and give it a nice stir so that it melts nicely.
  8.  on the other side, heat a pan, add ghee ( Ghee brings out the best taste in amti). Once ghee warms up add cumin seeds, mustard seeds, fenugreek seeds and let them splutter.
  9. Add pinch of asafoetida again, whole red chilli, curry leaves and onion pieces. fry them till onions are translucent. Add grated coconut if using and stir. Add the steamed / boiled drumsticks. Stir and add a little chilli powder. Let it cook for a minute or two.
  10. gently pour the dal over this seasoning and give a nice stir. Check for sweet, salt and spice and make changes as per your taste. It must have a nice tangy sweet flavor spiced by goda masala.
  11. Let it boil for a while. Add water if the amti seems thick. It is supposed to be a little runny and usually thickens after cooling so keep a little more watery than usual dal. Discard the kokum pieces.
  12. Garnish with freshly chopped coriander leaves and serve with hot steamed rice or bhakri.

It is essential to pour some hot ghee over amti bhat. It enhances the flavors and gives a lovely taste to the dish.

Note :

I used onion but traditionally no onion is used in this amti.

You can buy goda masala or amti masala from the stores or make them at home too.

Do let me know if you make this.

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Taste Of Banaras At ThreeSixtyOne|The Oberoi Gurgaon


I am a big supporter of revival of regional, traditional cuisine and the use of indigenous ingredients in daily meals. When I came to know about Banaras Ka Khana Showcase at ThreeSixtyOne, The Oberoi Gurgaon, curated by Chef Ravitej Nath along with a dear friend, food consultant and writer Sangeeta Khanna, I did not want to miss this opportunity to taste the flavours of the temple town cuisine. My mother was born and brought up there and we decided to bring to her a part of her childhood and youth as a pre-birthday gift. She turns 84 on 31st March.Exif_JPEG_420

They say, when you strongly desire something the universe conspires to bring it to you. A contest won me ‘complimentary meal for two’ making the whole experience even more exciting.

Our Holi inspired Dinner began with Panchamrit which is offered to the devotees at Hindu temples as a blessing from the Gods. It is also used in many religeous rituals. The whiff of tulsi (Holi Basil) and the correct sweetness of milk and honey in the drink was a perfect beginning to what was going to be an unforgettable experience.  We forgot to take the picture of Panchamrit.

The street food or chaats of Banaras in the Chef’s tasting menu left us longing for more. As we dug into Tamatar ki chaat, Chivda matar, chenna ka dahi vada and sumptuous aaloo tikki accompanied with traditional aaloo papad and the four chutneys the first thing that came to mind was the  hot, sour, savoury notes of each dish perfectly balancing each other. Nothing was too overwhelming. Wadiyon ki chatney was an instant hit.

The sublime flavours enhanced the pleasure of eating. Ma promptly gave her seal of approval as she remembered her childhood spent in the lanes of the holy city exploring these very delicacies except the tamatar chaat.

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Sangeeta later told us how the flavours of Gujrat have influenced the local cuisine and why. No wonder the tamatar chaat made me think of a similar dish sev tamatar.ki sabzi. It is amazing to see how the food has interconnections with so many parts of India and not just the city of Varanasi itself.

I loved Harad ki papdi, fara, bajka, bhapouri and bhabra too. We make Bajka at home and call it Lobra. Long time ago in Banaras, Harad ka golgappa was served  to digest all the fantastic chaat that the chaat bhandars fed you and this Harad ki papdi was a perfect revival of that. Excellent in taste and texture.

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The khus ka sherbat, aam panna were delicious but the thandai with special hand crafted portion and pan cocktail made with fresh pan leaves and lemon won my heart. Nowhere can one find something so fantastic. Both the drinks were simply out of the world.

The chefs had divided street food and main course in two distinct segments and the drinks served with them complimented the food perfectly.

We loved the street food totally. My son had never tasted the Banaras cuisine so it was a  unique experience for him. He loved the moong beans filled aaloo tiki and chene ka dahi vada.

I knew that the banaras ki thali was going to be a big sumptuous affair so we lingered with the pan mocktail reminiscing about the city and its culture.

We got both non vegetarian and vegetarian thalis in main course.

The Vegetarian Thali 

The Breads 

I had the vegetarian Thali and was bowled over by matar ka nimona (crushed green peas cooked with ginger and coriander) , Gular ka chokha, aaloo chokha and kaddu ki sabzi. It was very much the ghar ka khana. Each dish balancing the taste of the other. I found the flat breads a bit hard and one of the littis was under-cooked but the rest of amazing.  The khade masale ka pulav, made with short grain aromatic rice called Zeerabutti, had such a sublime flavour it really blew my mind.

I was surprised to see mom relishing the meal with such gusto as she is a very small eater. The khoya, matar, makhane ki sabzi was a delight. I had never tasted it before but my ma gave it 10/10 in taste. She found it as authentic as it could be. The tempered moong daal was just as we make at home. Delicious, to say the least.  Again, I found that the pairing of dishes was done in such a way that the tastes do not overwhelm each other.

The non -veg thali

Non Vegetarian Thali

The non veg thali had sookha jheenga (dried shrimps), motton kalia and sadi litti among other things and my son loved the shrimps and the river sol in mustard gravy.

I would love to go on about each dish but the festival is still on till 26th March at ThreeSixtyOne, The Oberoi Gurgaon and if you are in or around Delhi/NCR, you MUST visit and indulge in the Rivayat of Banaras.

Meals that are prepared and served with love are the best. We could see how Sangeeta had put her heart and soul in each preparation, going out of the way to procure the finest ingredients to create the original banarasi khana. Hats off to the F&B team of Chef Manish Sharma, Chef Ravitej Nath who recreated this fabulous along with Sangeeta

Now it was time for desserts and conversations with our gracious hostess.

 

As you can see mom had a lovely time reminiscing about Banaras with Sangeeta. They talked about traditions, city heritage, old houses, chawks and gaiyan, old eateries, their childhood and of course the delectable food. I was happy to see my mom enjoying every bit of the experience.

Malaiyyo, a specialty of Banaras, stole the show. Frothy, light as air and delicately tasteful,  it brought back a surge of nostalgia. Ma told that they would get up early morning before sunrise in winter to eat this delicacy which was then served in earthen pot the size of a small diwali diya. We loved the food and we loved the stories.

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The Desserts

Biranji Kheer

Biranji Kheer

The naturally tulsi scented Sankatmochan laddoos and Sri ram Bhandar’s lal peda (especially flown in from Banaras) were out of the world. I enjoyed the hare chane ki barfi which was new for me and the Biranji kheer was a delight. I make it at home but this was ethereal. Adi was bowled over by Malaiyyo.

Three generations in love with the vibrant food and Banaras came home with fondest memories, blissful dinning experience, unconditional love and a bagful of goodies.

I want to congratulate everyone who is part of Rivayat- Indian Culinary Conclave  and Banaras ka khana fest. You have kept the spirit and soul of the cuisine intact. Well done.

Special thanks for the warmth of hospitality by The Oberoi Gurgaon Staff. Thank you Mallika Gowda for your understanding and care.

Those who wish to know more about the dishes that were served here  or want to try making some of them at home, do visit Sangeeta’s blog Banaras ka Khana .

Everyday Food – Rajma Chawal (Red Kidney Beans With Rice )


I come from a family where rajma, chole, kaali daal (urad daal or mah ki daal) were not the part of daily food. As kids we would head to the nearest dhaba or a small hotel (hatti) to savour these delicacies. When I began to experiment in the kitchen I tried making these “Panjabi dishes” but the taste would never be close to what we had in the dhabbas or at homes of friends. It took me some time to master the art of making perfect rajma, chole and mah ki daal and not to forget the delicious sarson ka saag and makki ki roti. Then there was no looking back. 😀  Rajma chawal or red kidney beans and steamed rice is one of my comfort foods and I relish it like nothing else. When I was younger it was a sunday meal special. Maybe alternate sunday meal. Then I got married into a family where it became an alternate day meal 😀 and I began to long for the simple varan bhat and all the home cooked simple meals from mom’s home.  My MIL wont allow any “peeli daal (yellow daal” unless someone was sick :p but in her absence I began to balance the two different cuisines and it worked well for all of us.

Rajma again became my favorite over chole because of the wholesome feeling it provided. The creamy gently spiced curry with steaming rice in a bowl or a deep dish with maybe a dollop of butter or thick curds was all I needed to cease my troubles.

Rajma or kidney beans curry is synonymous with Panjab and Kashmir too. I love the Bhaderwah Rajma (the small deep red variety from Jammu). I find its strong color, meaty texture and robust flavour just right. We do get chitri wale rajmah and some other varieties too but these work best for me.

The key to making good rajma is that they should be soaked and boiled rightly and cooked with just the touch of spices added to onion and tomatoes. The Kashmiri rajma doesn’t have onions. They use fennel seeds powder that gives the dish a unique flavor.

Red kidney beans are so versatile that they are cooked in variety of ways, as a curry, in salads, in dips, as fillings with veggies and even in a pasta dish. while reading on internet I realized that bean rice esp red kidney beans and rice is popular in many other countries as well. Says a lot about this humble beanie wonder. The very picture of a nicely cooked rajma chawal makes you yearn for it right away. In Delhi you will find roadside pushcart vendors doing a brisk business selling rajma chawal per plate. People throng these pushcarts or small kiosks for a filling no mess lunch/dinner.

This is my version of the hearty rajma chawal. It is simple and tasty one pot meal.

Ingredients:

Red Kidney Beans (Rajma/Rajmah) – 1 cup

Tomatoes – 4 medium finely chopped or (half cup purée)

Onions – 2 medium (finely chopped)

garlic -1/2 inch (2 tsp paste)

Garlic – 3-4 cloves ( 2 tsp paste)

Bay leave 1 or Curry leaves – 5-8

Cumin seeds – 1 tsp

Butter -1 teaspoon

Ghee – I tablespoon

coriander Powder -2 tsp

Turmeric Powder -1 tsp

Red chili powder or Kashmiri chili powder – 2 tsp or  to taste

Salt – to taste

Coriander greens – 1/4 cup finely chopped

Garam Masala – 1 tsp

Asafoetida – generous pinch

Ajwain – 2 pinches

Method : 

Clean and wash the red kidney beans properly under running water and soak in filtered water for 8-10 hours. When in a rush I boil some water for soaking and place the beans in a casserole along with boiling water for 2-4 hours and close the lid properly. It works well. The variety I have used here doesn’t need too much soaking time.

Once the kidney beans or rajma is soaked properly, drain the pinkish water and wash the beans at least twice with fresh water. This ensures the removal of water-soluble phytates which cause flatulence). Always throw away the water in which you soak the beans. 

Pressure cook kidney beans with at least 4-5 cups of water, salt, turmeric powder,  asafitida (hing) and two pinches of ajwain (aids in digestion).Four to five whistles are usually good to soften the rajma. It should be cracked and soft but not mushy.

Now, in a cast iron pot or any heavy bottom pan heat the ghee. Add cumin seeds and hing to hot ghee/oil and when the seeds splutter and give out a nice aroma add bay leave or curry leaves which I have used here along with finely chopped onions. Keep the heat low to medium and stir.Once translucent, add ginger and garlic to it and stir again. You can add a little salt and a 1/2 tsp of sugar and red chili powder here so quicken the browning of the onions. Add a tablespoon of water and give it a stir.  Sugar gives a nice deep color to the gravy and cuts the acidity of the tomatoes too.

Saute the masala till onions are nice and brown, . Add coriander powder, turmeric powder a mix well. Once all the spices are incorporated nicely and the masala browns evenly add the finely chopped tomatoes. Give it a good mix and keep the heat low so that the masala is more flavourful with the juices of onion and tomatoes.

Once the mix starts drying up and leaves the sides of the pot add the boiled rajma to it. Mix everything well and let it simmer on low heat. At this point , add chopped coriander leaves.

Alternately, you can microwave chopped onions, garlic, ginger, a small green chilli and  tomatoes for 5 min in a covered dish then take out and purée them to make a paste. Add this paste to the boiled kidney beans along with the spices for a no oil quick fix. You can add butter while serving. I do this when in a rush.

By now you would be dying to get the aromatic rajma off the heat. The moment you notice a creamy texture to the dish, take it off the heat and serve hot with steamed rice. I have used old pona basmati chawal or 1/4 broken basmati rice here. It is soft, fragrant and easy to digest. The older the raw rice the better it will taste.

Many people love rajma but avoid it as it hard on digestive system but by adding hing, ajwain, curry leaves/bay leave and throwing the soaking water away you can enjoy this fabulous nutritious dish anytime.

Did I tell you that red kidney beans are power packed with healthy nutrients? Like many other beans they have cholesterol lowering fiber, low in fat they are good source of folate, protein, thiamine (vitamin B1), phosphorus, iron, copper, magnesium, and potassium. And they taste heavenly.

Do give my recipe a try and let me know how you found it. Include red kidney beans in your daily diet.

Pan Seared Chicken Breasts With Potato Mash And Apricot Chutney


Now this is what I call comfort food. I love all the three things and make many variations of them but this one is my favorite.Dinner tonight is a complete potpourri of exotic flavours. I usually add different herbs to the marinade or grill/ pan sear the chicken without yogurt too. One can get creative with it and have many versions of the same dish. Chicken is low-fat and high protein and a perfect dish for light dinners.

Sometimes I make extra marinade and love to use it as a thick sauce that wraps the succulent chicken breasts. These fillets can be served on their own or with any condiment like the spicy sweet and tangy Apricot Chutney I made yesterday. Click on name for the recipe. It tastes yummy with the chicken.

Make sure to pound the breasts to get it grilled nicely and evenly so they don’t dry out and stay tender.

To make pan grilled/seared chicken breasts you will need

Boneless juicy chicken breasts – 2 ( clean and pounded evenly 1/2 inch thickness)

Marinade 

You can either marinade the breasts in olive oil, lemon juice, lemon zest and lots of herbs, garlic and salt. Place it all in a ziplock bag and rub it properly so the flavours get infused as it rests for at least  2-4 hours. I sometimes keep it even longer. Use cilantro, oregano, parsley, rosemary or any other herb of your choice.

For the Spiced yogurt marinade you need:

1/2 cup plain yogurt

2 table-spoon Olive Oil ( I used extra virgin)

2 tablespoon lemon juice

Mix herbs ( powder or fresh or both)

Salt to taste

Freshly crushed black peppercorns – 6-7

Garlic pods – 5 crushed and roughly chopped

Red chilli flakes – 1/4 teaspoon or less

Lemon Zest – a little

Butter – 1 tablespoon

Prepare to grill/Sear  

Whisk together yogurt, garlic, olive oil, lemon juice, lemon zest, crushed peppercorns and herbs. you can add a little powdered black pepper too. (I do)

Add the pounded chicken breasts and thoroughly coat them with the marinade,  Place the chicken with the marinade in ziplock bag or Tupperware box for a few hours. I keep it overnight in the fridge too or at least four hours.

You must make cuts in the chicken to let the marinade absorb into it.

When you are about to grill/sear, take the chicken out and let it come to room temperature if it was in the fridge.

Heat a skillet or a pan. Add olive oil and a dash of butter and coat the bottom. Once the oil is hot place the chicken breasts gently and pour the marinade over the fillets.

Cover for ten minutes on medium flame and then cook uncovered on high flame. Turn them over once nice crispy golden brown from one side. To check if the chicken is evenly cooked, make a cut in the thick part. If the knife smoothly cuts it then its done.

Keep stirring the marinade in the pan and tossing it over the chicken. If you are making with the sauce keep some marinade separately and once you take out the chicken in plate, Pour the remaining marinade in the pan and cook it till nice, thick and brown. Pour the rich pan sauce on the seared breasts when you serve. Keep the pan covered on very low heat for sometime to let the juices and flavours seep in. Dont keep lifting the lid to peek. 🙂

Turn off the heat and let the chicken breasts sit for another ten minutes in the pan before laying them on the serving plate.

Make the mashed potatoes along so the full meal is ready at the same time. You can steam some greens too. or perhaps some corncob. It goes very well with the chicken dish.

The best way to know if you are doing it right it to keep your sense awake. If it smells, looks, tastes good then you are doing it right. All the brown bits that stick to the pan give the flavour. We will use them while making mashed potato.

For the Potato Mash 

4 potatoes – medium size

Salt and crushed pepper corns ( to taste)

A few herbs maybe

I love garlic so a few pods of garlic skinned and crushed

Salted Butter – 1 table-spoon ( if using salted butter go easy on table salt. I use sea salt too)

Method:

Wash and boil the potatoes till tender. Peal and mash them properly so no lumps stay.

In the same pan in which we made chicken sprinkle a little olive oil and butter. ( there will be enough fat in it already and those gorgeous flavourful brown bits sticking to the pan)

Scrap the brown bits so they release the flavour in the oil , add the crushed garlic and stir till light golden brown. Keep the heat low.

Mix salt pepper to the mashed potatoes and toss the mix into the pan.Let it sizzle for a few seconds and turn over so all the brown chicken sauce etc sticking to the pan and clean it. Turn the heat off and remove the mashed potatoes a bowl.

If vegan , you can take a different pan and use just olive oil to brown the garlic and potatoes. or infuse the oil with roasted garlic and add to the mashed potatoes. Works well either ways.

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To assemble: 

Take a serving plate and place a good helping of mashed potatoes, arrange the seared chicken breasts to one side of it and place a generous portion of Apricot chutney on top of the hot chicken. If you wish you can add some greens, boiled corncob , toasted bread with cheese etc. Or just eat the chicken and potato mash with chutney.

Hope some of you will try this recipe and let me know your views.  The chicken and mash are delicious on its own too.

These mashed potatoes do not use any milk or cream and even butter can be replaced with just olive oil to make it pure vegan. I used the garlic infused fat that was left in the pan after making grilled chicken to slightly brown the mashed potatoes and give it a unique flavour.

Bon Appetit

Recipe – Gatte Ki Sabzi (Chickpea Flour Dumpling Curry)


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I love gatte ki sabzi as much as I love kadhi pakoda . Usually I keep both the besan dishes simple but sometimes I add veggies to give the original one some new flavor and texture. The traditional gatta curry is a staple dish from Rajasthan made with chickpea flour dumplings dunked in thick yogurt gravy with spices. A delicious blend of flavours. I have someone with lactose intolerance so I made this particular one with onion and tomato gravy which is equally delightful in taste. I am giving both versions here.

The dish can be had with rice or roti. You can make it with a little gravy or just let the gattas soak in all the spiced curry and use it as a dry vegetable.

Ingredients :

To make Gatta you will need:

Besan (chickpea flour) – 1 Cup

Dry roasted cumin powder – 1/2 teaspoon

Red Chili Powder – 1 teaspoon

Turmeric Powder – 1/2 teaspoon

Coriander Powder – 1/2 Teaspoon

Oil – 1 teaspoon

Asafoetida – A Pinch

Salt to Taste

Water – Enough to make a semi hard dough ( I sometimes use Mattha/Tak/whisked curd instead of water)

For the onion tomato base gravy you will need :

Onion – 1 Big (finely chopped)

Tomatoes – 3-4 Medium Size ( grated or puréed )

Ginger – 1/2 inch (grated)

Garlic – 2-3 cloves (grated)

Fresh coriander leaves – 1/4 cup

Turmeric Powder – 1/2 Teaspoon

Coriander Powder – 1 Heaped Teaspoon

Red Chili Powder – 1/2 Teaspoon or to taste

Asafoetida Powder – A pinch

Cumin Seeds – 1/2 Teaspoon

Mustard Oil – 2 Tablespoon (You can use any other oil too)

Method 

To prepare the gatta or dumplings

Take a big mixing bowl and throw in all the ingredients listed for making the dumplings (gatta) except the dahi/mattha/tak(buttermilk) or water.

Mix them well.

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Now slowly add the prefered liquid or curd as you bind the chickpea flour. Add enough to make a dough which is neither too hard nor too soft. Stiff enough to roll out like sausages. 1inch thickness is okay. You can roll them out longer too. I find this size convenient to handle.

Now take a heavy bottom pan and boil enough water in it to cover the rounded gatta strips. Delicately slide the sausage like strips into boiling water and let them boil for at least 20-30 mins.

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Once done the gatta strips will turn white in colour and float to the top. This is the time to take them out slowly in a plate and let them dry.

Once dry cut them in to smaller pieces. ( some people fry these before adding to the curry. i keep it oil free.)

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Keep them aside and prepare the curry now.

For the curry 

Put a heavy bottom pan on heat and add the oil. Once the mustard oil reaches smoking point add asafoetida and cumin seeds. Add chopped onions. Add salt at this time. It helps the onion to brown quicker. Once the onion turns golden brown add ginger and garlic and saute it too. Add red chili powder and a little water so that the mixture doesn’t burn.It also lifts the spices. Lower the flame and let it cook for a while then add the grated tomatoes. Stir properly and let it simmer on low flame. Keep it covered. Once the mixture seems cooked , add the spices (haldi, coriander) Mix well.

Cook it till the oil starts separating from the masala. Once it reaches that stage add gattas and stir. Do it slowly so the gattas don’t break. Cover and let the dumplings soak in the flavours.

After five-ten minutes stir it again. ( At this stage you can leave out adding the liquid and enjoy the semi dry veggie with rotis/ parathas etc. Garnishing it with chopped coriander ) Or add warm water to the mixture to make a thick gravy. Stirring in as you add the liquid. Keep the flame high and bring it to a boil. Let it boil for a few minutes then reduce the heat.

Once the gravy is thick and the aromas begin to fill your kitchen it is time to turn off the gas and garnish the gatta curry with freshly chopped coriander leaves.

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Enjoy the curry with rice or roti.

To make the Curd gravy you need 

Whisked Curd – 1 cup instead of water. All other ingredients remain the same.

Heat oil ( or Ghee which I prefer when using curd), add hing, cumin seeds and a whole red chili. Once the seeds splutter, add chopped onion , ginger, garlic and fry till golden brown, add chilli powder, coriander powder, turmeric powder,salt and sprinkle a little water to deglaze the pan.and lift the spices. Fry it till it leaves oil. Gently tip in the whisked curd little by little. Keep stirring so it doesn’t curdle.

Keep the flame low. Stir till the masala is integrated properly Add a little water if needed to prepare the thick gravy. Let it boil for sometime and then tip in the gatta pieces. Let it simmer on slow flame for at least 10 minutes. Keep it covered.

Once done remove from flame and garnish with finely chopped fresh coriander leaves before serving.