Kinnow And Orange Marmalade Recipe


 

I like bitter marmalade to the moon and back. Thick cut, medium cut or thin cut, I love it both ways but I am a little particular about the sweetness part. I like my marmalade slightly more bitter. Fans of marmalade are very touchy about how the marmalade should look, taste. Some like it a bit soft, runny while others may prefer a perfectly set, some juice the fruit others chop it and use the pulp with rind, some prefer large, juicy chunky pot of gold while some like the slivers of sun in there bottle. Every texture has a taker who loves this deliciousness. There are hundreds of methods and each is right. I am sharing mine with you though each marmalade recipe is sentimentally personal. Always read the full recipe before starting off to make.

I have made this one with Kinnow and oranges. Both are selling in abundance right now and the fruits are packed with pectin so no artificial pectin added to this recipe. The pips, pith and skin rich in natural pectin will do the job.

Kinnow is basically a hybrid variety of two kinds of citrus cultivars – King (Citrus nobilis) and Willow Leaf (Citrus x deliciosa).cultivated throughout Northern India and even in other citrus growing states.This popular and delicious fruit is considered as one of the healthiest because of its health benefits but those you can Google. Kinnow fruit is juicy and has thicker pulp than oranges and even the pith is thicker. I find them perfect for marmalade. Here I used a few oranges too but didn’t use their peel as it was bruised. Also a twist in taste came with a hint of ginger juice. It gives such a kick to the marmalade I can’t tell you.

Preparing marmalade is a labor of love. It is one of those erotic kitchen romances. If you detest long drawn processes of preparations and cooking then this recipe is not for you. There is a certain joy in peeling oranges, making those slivers of the peel, scooping out the pulp or cutting the fruit with juice dripping all over, the slow cooking and then basking in the bitter sweet aroma of the orange nectar that will fill your home.

Here’s how you will make that magic happen: (I missed two process pix here. (Deleted them by mistake so sorry about that)

Ingredients:

Kinnow – 3

Oranges – 2 large (Total fruit pulp was about 1/2 kg or 500 gm)

Sugar – 800 gm (adjustable)

Juice of lemon – 2 tablespoon

Ginger juice – 1/2 tbsp (optional)

Water – 1 liter approx

Method : 

Wash, wipe and peel the fruit. Always buy firm, ripe fruit that is not bruised.

With a sharp knife scrap the pith from the peels and keep aside. Do the same with the peeled fruit. Remove all the white pith and pips. Collect it in a muslin cloth and tie in tightly to make a pouch.

Now, shred the peel into the desired length and thickness. I sliced into thin it into thin slivers for this batch. Keep it aside and chop the fleshy fruit fine. Some people juice the fruit and discard the pulp or cut the oranges with the rind into moon like slices but my marmalade is not translucent when made it is voluptuous to say the least with a strong citrus flavor and thick texture. The juicing gives a pale clear jelly like texture which you usually see in marmalade.

Meanwhile place a small steel plate in the freezer for the sheet test.

Once you have the pouch, the slivers of peel, the fleshy pulp all ready take a medium size pan and put the slivers of rind in it. Add enough water to cover the rind and boil for ten minutes. Turn off the flame and discard the water. Do it one more time. This is to ensure the correct bitterness needed for the recipe. Also, the rind will soften a bit. Once the sugar is added the rind doesn’t soften. This is what I learned.

Now, in a large thick bottom pan add, fruit pulp, water, sugar, ginger and the lemon juice.  Place the tightly secured pouch containing pips and pith in the mixture. Lemon is needed as pectin needs acid to set in. The amount of sugar depends how you lie your before adding he r marmalade and how sweet the oranges are. mine were very sweet and I like bitter taste. Warming the sugar cuts down the frothing which you need to skim to avoid clouding the final product.  1:2 fruit sugar ratio works fine. I added a little less as I prefer more bitter taste. You can adjust.

Cook the mixture on medium heat to dissolve the sugar properly then turn up the heat and bring the mixture to rolling boil. Let it cook for 10 minutes then reduce the heat to medium – low to let the mixture simmer. Cook it for 40-50 minutes stirring every 5 minutes so that e mixture doesn’t stick to the bottom of the pan or overflows. Keep skimming the froth.

Never ever press the pouch with the ladle. Let it just sit in the boiling mixture for some more time then gently remove it.

Once the liquid reduces pay more attention. You need to stop the cooking process at the right time – too early and you get a runny marmalade, too late and you get a sticky mass that won’t spread.

Do the sheet test for checking. Drop a little marmalade on the chilled plate and see if it flows or shows signs of jellying. I prefer not to wait for that stage. I like when it slowly slides when the plate is tilted. Once cool it will set nicely.

If it is too runny cook a little more if it hardens then your best bet is to boil a little water and add it to marmalade and heat a bit more till you get right texture.

Once done turn off the heat and let it become warm from hot. Stir it to distribute the peels evenly. Ladle it in clean glass or ceramic jars and close the lid tightly. My jar has vacuum tight so perfect for storing it.

So, here we have gorgeous sunny marmalade that has the perfect bitter sweet rich taste. Spread it on your morning toast as a wake up call to a bright sunny happy day.

 

Tip- If you want a clear marmalade you need to squeeze the peeled oranges in a jug and use the discarded pulp in the pectin pouch along with pip and pith. Use this juice with, water and shredded peels to make the marmalade. I will try to make a small batch and put up the method in a few days. 

You can use other citrus fruit too. The ratio of sugar, fruit and water will differ accordingly.

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