Homemade Karonda (natal fruit) Jam Recipe


Karonda Pickle Recipe Here.

Karonda is an exotic fruit which grows wild in bushes in India it is part of the family carrisa and its botanical name is carrisa carandas. It is a beautiful ivory color fruit with deep blush of red and pink on it. It has medicinal properties and can be made in to preserves, syrups etc. In north India it is also made into pickle. It tastes very sour and there are different colored karondas available from purple to deep red in India. We commonly get the Ivory ones in summer and make jam from them. Here is my recipe for karonda jam.

Karonda Jam 

Ingredients :

1/2 kg Karonda ( fruit should not be damaged or spotted)

1 kg. sugar

4 cups water

 Method :

Wash Karonda fruit properly and cut them in halves.

Take out the pits(seeds) and place the fruit in water.(throw this water as it will be extremely sour)

Heat a heavy bottom pan and boil the fruit in new water .

The moment fruit becomes tender add sugar and keep stirring.

Some people sieve the fruit after boiling and then add sugar but I love the pieces of fruit in the jam . For those who like smooth jams the tender fruit can be passed through a sieve so a pulp is obtained.

Stir constantly till sugar dissolves and the pulp thicken.

I forgot to mention some details so here is an

Added note from a comment by reader:

“While making jam with or without sieving, how much time to cook after adding sugar is critical. “ek tar’ is grandmas wisdom. When the sugar thickens enough so that dipping your finger in the liquid and separating them leaves one ‘string’ attached to your fingers, it is done. More cooking than that will caramelize the sugar. The western wisdom is to freeze a plate in the fridge. Drop a bit of the jam liquid in it and pull a finger through it when you feel the jam is thick enough. If the finger leaves a gap in the syrup, the jam is cooked enough. If not, you can cook a little more.”

Remove from flame and cool.

Once cool spoon it in a glass bottle.

The karonda fruit is full of vitamin C and is rich source of iron and that makes it good for those suffering from anemia.

Do try the recipe and enjoy this wonderful jam.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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9 thoughts on “Homemade Karonda (natal fruit) Jam Recipe

  1. My mom and nani used to make this karonde ki subzi that was absolutely delicious…..arghhh now I’m hungry and there are no karonde in this country! I’ll let my mom know abt the jam. Thanks!!

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  2. I made the jam after sieving but reduced the sugar to 750 gms. The taste was really superb and there was a lingering flavour just like cranberries. Thanks for the delicious recipe. I now know what to do with the Korandas growing in my garden.

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  3. I harvest the koronda bushes in my farm to make both jams and pickles for self, family and friends. Just used your recipe for the sweet and sour pickle with chillies, waiting to try it.
    Regarding the jam, with or without sieving, how much time to cook after adding sugar is critical. “ek tar’ is grandmas wisdom. When the sugar thickens enough so that dipping your finger in the liquid and separating them leaves one ‘string’ attached to your fingers, it is done. More cooking than that will caramelise the sugar. The western wisdom is to freeze a plate in the fridge. Drop a bit of the jam liquid in it and pull a finger through it when you feel the jam is thick enough. If the finger leaves a gap in the syrup, the jam is cooked enough. If not, you can cook a little more.
    May like to add to your recipe if you think it will help your readers.
    By the way, I use only 600 gams sugar for 500 grams fruit. Makes it slightly tart and sweet, which I love.
    Sudipto

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Hello Sudipto,
    Thank you for your detailed comment. You are absolutely right. When I make the jam for myself I use 600-750 gm of sugar but the family wants sweeter version so I used the 1 KG sugar recipe thinking people may like more sweetness. The flavor is lost if you add more sugar. I love the tartness too.
    Regarding the cooking time after the sugar, technically you are absolutely right. I go by my judgement so forgot to mention this point , will certainly add it. Not everyone is aware of such little details so it is important to mention. I hope you like the pickle. There are variations of it and I would love to know if you make in any other way with less oil. Everyday use.
    Tikuli

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